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Hisila Yami

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Hisila Yami, alias Parvati (born June 25, 1959 in Kathmandu), is a Nepalese politician and architect. She is a Central Committee member of Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and a former president of the All Nepal Women’s Association (Revolutionary).Yami graduated from the School of Planning and Architecture in Delhi, India, in 1982. She completed her M. Arch. from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in U.K. in 1995.
During the 1990 uprising against the panchayat regime, Yami was one of the most high-profile women leaders in the protests.She was also the General Secretary of All India Nepalese Students’ Association, 1981–1982. She was a lecturer at Institute of Engineering, Pulchowk Campus from 1983 to 1996.In 1995 she became the President of the All Nepal Women’s Association (Revolutionary) and served a two-year term. She went underground in 1996 after the inception of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) led People’s War. Since 2001, she has been a Central Committee Member of CPN (Maoist) and has worked in departments such as the International Department of the organization.
She made her first public appearance on June 18, 2003, during the then ongoing peace negotiations between the government and the Maoists.[1]
In early 2005 she was, along with Bhattarai and Dina Nath Sharma, demoted by the party leadership. In July she was reinstated into the Central Committee.
On April 1, 2007 Hisila Yami joined the interim government of Nepal as Minister of Physical Planning and Works. [2] Following a Maoist boycott of the government from September to December 2007, Yami was again sworn in as Minister of Physical Planning on December 31, 2007.[1] Following her victory in the Constituent Assembly elections, 2008, from Kathmandu constituency no. 7, she became a member of the Constituent Assembly. She joined the CPN (Maoist) led government in September as Minister for Tourism and Civil Aviation. Yami is married to fellow Maoist leader Dr. Baburam Bhattarai.

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